The English Language Institute (ELI) of the Center for International Service has offered innovative academic programs for students learning English as a Second Language since the late 1970’s. Our course of study is designed to challenge and engage students. Students are immersed in the language, culture, and ethnicity of New York City. Classes range from beginner to the advanced level.

Monday, March 31, 2014

MISS THE BOAT

"To miss the boat" means to be too late to get something you want or need.

Example:
Susan: Oh! They were giving away free samples of cheesecake in the cafeteria this morning?
Ian: Yes, it was delicious. You missed the boat!


                                         image courtesy of dreamstime.com

Saturday, March 22, 2014

LIKE CLOCKWORK

If something happens "like clockwork," it happens on time, exactly, and regularly.

We can also say that something "runs like clockwork," to say that it works well.


For example, if your newspaper is delivered exactly at 7am each morning without fail, when you see the delivery boy arrive at 7am one morning, you can say: "Like clockwork."

                                        image courtesy of dreamstime.com



Monday, March 17, 2014

PAY THROUGH THE NOSE :: (BE) A STEAL

If you paid through the nose, it means you paid too much for something.

On the other hand, if something was a steal, it was a bargain or gotten at a reasonable price.


For example:

Ron: You paid $3000 for this car! I think you paid through the nose. You should try to get your money back.

Richie: I disagree. This car has only 50, 000 miles and runs like new. In my opinion, it was a steal.

                                           image courtesy of dreamstime.com

Thursday, February 13, 2014

BE SNOWED UNDER

If you are "snowed under," it means that you are overwhelmed with or have too much work and cannot manage it all.

A similar idiom is to be "swamped" - a swamp is a wetland near a forest.


Example:

The doctor has twenty appointments this morning. He is snowed under. He will probably not have time to have lunch until 2pm.


                                                                        image courtesy of dreamstime.com

Saturday, February 1, 2014

COME UP WITH

To "come up with" means to think of something, such as an idea or a plan.

Example:

Suzy: "Julie's birthday is tomorrow and we haven't thought of anything to get her yet."
Katie: "Don't worry. We will come up with something."




                                         image courtesy of dreamstime.com

Wednesday, December 11, 2013

HOLD YOUR HORSES

If you are asked to hold your horses, it means that you should wait.

Ruby: Come on! Let's go!
Michelle: Hold your horses. I'm coming in a minute.

                                            image courtesy of dreamstime.com